Pakistan Goes Green with Renewable Energy Jhimpir Wind Project

Pakistan's renewable energy Jhimpir Wind Project gets global recognition. (Photo: Express Tribune)

Pakistan's renewable energy Jhimpir Wind Project gets global recognition. (Photo: Express Tribune)

When speaking of Pakistan these days, good news is unfortunately hard to wring out. Global newspapers are mostly saturated with the latest in terrorism, eco-catastrophes, or some geopolitical brouhaha that has the country and its expatriates shaking their heads. But recently, the winds have changed — literally. Pakistan’s Zorlu Energy Wind Project (a.k.a. Jhimpir Wind) is the nation’s first wind farm, providing a much-needed source for renewable energy in the perpetually cash-strapped developing nation.

With over 30 percent of the Pakistani population lacking regular access to electricity, UK-based Project Finance Magazine, which covers global infrastructure and industrial project news, recently recognized the Jhimpir Wind Project in Pakistan as the ‘Middle East Renewables Deal of the Year.’ The wind power plant is estimated to provide enough electricity to improve the load-shedding situation (brownouts and power rationing in major cities), while also saving over 90,000 tons of CO2 emissions on a yearly basis.

The idea of ‘green’ living — recycling and minimizing carbon footprints — may seem like second nature to citizens of the United States. The concept, however, has yet to be embedded in the minds of South Asian nations such as Pakistan. That wind energy can be harnessed to address the ever-increasing needs of a nation where power demand surged by over 40 percent in the past five years, is a bigger deal than most Pakistanis or Americans can likely fully comprehend. But what both sides may better appreciate is that this venture, financed by Turkish developer Zorlu Enerji, is now opening the door to potentially greater investments with the international community as well.

As is the case with other nations, including the U.S., Pakistan’s Alternative Energy Development Board (AEDB) is now looking to other alternative energy sources rather than fossil fuels and hopes the international community will invest in these projects. “We take pride in building the first wind power plant in Pakistan,” said Murat Bursa, CEO of Zorlu Energy Pakistan Ltd. “Our partnership in this particular project will have a positive impact within the region in terms of social and economic [opportunities].”


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Sabeen H. Ahmad is the Social Media Editor at Divanee.com.